Chapter 12 – Sexually Transmissible Infections (STIs)

Mycoplasma genitalium

Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) is an emerging sexually transmissible pathogen which was first recognised in the 1980s and implicated in urethritis in men and several inflammatory reproductive tract syndromes in women, including cervicitis, PID and infertility. MG is also thought to have possible roles in spontaneous abortion, preterm birth and female infertility.

MG is present in the general population at rates of 1-3 per cent, which is lower than those of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.(31)Β Most infections are asymptomatic, but higher rates of symptomatic infections with NGU, cervicitis and PID are seen in young people and MSM. A quarter of infections can persist for up to 12 months, and studies have shown persistent carriage of MG in treatment-resistant infections in women for up to 2-3 years. Asymptomatic urethral carriage in men has been demonstrated for up to 5 months.

MG is thought to be responsible for 10-20 per cent of the non-chlamydial, non-gonococcal urethritis and pathogen negative PIDs, which are seen in practice. It is thought to be present in at least 45 per cent of cases of persistent /recurrent urethritis. A PCR test is available, and testing can be done on FPU samples, endocervical swabs and vaginal swabs as for ... Buy now

History

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Examination

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Investigations

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Management

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Contact tracing

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