Chapter 12 – Sexually Transmissible Infections (STIs)

Genital warts

Warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), which often causes no clinical disease, i.e. the majority of people with HPV infection will be asymptomatic. Genital warts were once one of the most common STIs seen in general practice. However, the prevalence of genital warts in the Australian population under age 26 has fallen dramatically since HPV vaccination began in April 2007. Sexual Health Clinic surveillance data show a 96% decline in genital warts in women under age 21 years from 2007 to 2016 and an 83% decline in women aged 21-30 years as a result of HPV vaccination.(41) Among heterosexual men under age 21 attending a sexual health clinic, there has been a 93% decline in the diagnosis of genital warts between 2007 and 2017 and a 33% decline since male vaccination was introduced in 2013. In 2017 vaccination coverage at age 15 was 80% in females and 76% in males.

HPV is a small double-stranded DNA virus of which there are more than 100 genotypes. Around 40 different genotypes cause genital lesions, and these can be divided into those that cause genital warts with a low risk of progression to cancer and those associated with a moderate ... Buy now

Examination

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Investigations

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Management

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Treatment

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Contact tracingΒ 

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